Baylor Research Team Gets $6.3M to Study Disparities Among Minorities with Prostate, Breast Cancers

Baylor Research Team Gets $6.3M to Study Disparities Among Minorities with Prostate, Breast Cancers
The National Cancer Institute (NCI) has awarded a Baylor College of Medicine research team $6.3 million to develop patient-derived mouse models aimed at understanding the biological reasons behind racial and ethnic health disparities in prostate and breast cancers. In particular, the funding will help Baylor establish a Minority Patient-derived Xenograft Development and Trial Center (M-PDTC), which will include Baylor and MD Anderson Cancer Center experts specializing in devleoping patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models, molecular biology and signaling pathways, treatment studies in animals, and pathology and clinical management of prostate and breast cancer. Patient-derived xenografts are basically disease mouse models created using patients’ own tumor cells, which are then implanted into mice and used to study tumor environment or response to specific treatments. Funded as part of the Beau Biden Cancer Moonshot Initiative, the center will be directed by Nicholas Mitsiades, MD, PhD, associate director of the Center for the Biology of Health Disparities and co-leader of Baylor’s Nuclear Receptor Program. He is also associate professor of medicine-hematology at Baylor. “While socioeconomic and environmental factors definitely contribute to racial and ethnic cancer health disparities, there is also evidence for biological differences, and Baylor is a leader in their study,” Mitsiades, said in a
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