10-Year Survival of Young Low- and Intermediate-risk Prostate Cancer Patients Better with Radiation than Surgery

10-Year Survival of Young Low- and Intermediate-risk Prostate Cancer Patients Better with Radiation than Surgery
Radiation therapy approaches — including brachytherapy and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) — lead to better 10-year survival rates than prostate surgery in young patients with low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer, a study shows. The research, "Brachytherapy Improves 10-year Overall Survival Compared to Prostatectomy Alone in Young Men (≤60) with Low- and Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer: An NCDB Analysis," was presented at the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) 2018 Annual Meeting, in October in San Antonio, Texas. The treatment of choice for men with localized prostate cancer largely depends on the likelihood that the cancer will get worse. Using measures of cancer aggressiveness, clinical stage, and PSA levels, doctors usually group men into categories of low, intermediate, or high risk of cancer progression and adjust treatment accordingly. Studies that determine which treatment is more suited for each risk group, however, have not taken into account patients' age, which is known to affect how well they respond to certain treatments. Researchers at New York Presbyterian Brooklyn Methodist Hospital aimed to compare the survival outcomes of young prostate cancer patients (ages 18-60) receiving surgery or radiation. The team examined men whose cancer had not spread and who had been offered prostatectomy — a surgical procedure where all or part of the prostate is removed — external beam radiation (EBRT) alone, brachytherapy alone, or a combination of 
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