Grants Will Fuel UK Researchers’ Drive Toward Prostate Cancer-Killing Virus

Grants Will Fuel UK Researchers’ Drive Toward Prostate Cancer-Killing Virus
Scientists from the Queen Mary University of London have received grants worth more than £2.5 million ($3.2 million), awarded by Prostate Cancer UK to advance prostate cancer research. The funds, which are part of the charity's Research Innovation Awards scheme, aim to foster innovative and ambitious research projects across the United Kingdom that seek to improve the health and well-being of men living with, or at high risk of being diagnosed, prostate cancer. "Prostate cancer is on target to become the U.K.'s most commonly diagnosed cancer by 2030, and every year over 9,000 men are diagnosed with prostate cancer too late and told that it can't be cured," Matthew Hobbs, PhD, director of research at Prostate Cancer UK, said in a press release. "That's why we're funding innovative research like this to benefit men diagnosed with a later stage of the disease. By funding these six hugely exciting research projects at three different London institutions we believe that London will become an even more effective hub for research that will help to tame prostate cancer," Hobbs said. One of the awardees, Gunnel Halldén, PhD, saw her work being funded for the second time, thanks to her focus on creating a virus capable of recognizing and killing prostate cancer cells. The project builds on previous work, also funded by Prostate Cancer UK, in which Halldén and her research team showed the flu-like virus was able to selectively infect and eliminate prostate cancer cells while leaving healthy cells unharmed. In addition, the group showed that when injected directly into tumors together with standard chemotherapy agents, the virus not only eliminated cancer cells, but also prevented them from becoming resistant to chemotherapy, a common issue for patients with a
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