Robotic Prostatectomy is Popular, but Not Superior to Other Options, Study Says

Robotic Prostatectomy is Popular, but Not Superior to Other Options, Study Says
While current clinical data support no difference in the survival outcomes of prostate cancer patients after robotic surgery or radiation therapy, men tend to prefer surgery after consulting with their urologists and radiation oncologists, according to a small Australian study. Researchers found that treatment choices were primarily influenced by recommendations from clinicians, mainly urologists, and think that incomplete or biased information is often conveyed to patients. The study, “Robot or radiation? A qualitative study of the decision support needs of men with localized prostate cancer choosing between robotic prostatectomy and radiotherapy treatment,” was published in the journal Patient Education and Counseling. When a man receives a diagnosis of localized prostate cancer, the most common treatments offered are radical prostatectomy — surgical removal of the prostate and surrounding tissues — radiation therapy, or active surveillance. While the survival outcomes of these approaches are similar, each is linked with different effects on quality of life. "Radiotherapy is more likely to cause bowel dysfunction, while urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction are more common after radical prostatectomy," researchers said. Robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy is becoming popular because it minimizes side effects; nonetheless, there is limited evidence of better results with this approach. “There is ongoing debate over the best way to manage men with localized prostate cancer,” Ben Smith, co-deputy director of the
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