Prostate Cancer’s Risk and Mortality Rates Dropping or Stabilizing in Most Countries, 5-Year Data Shows

Prostate Cancer’s Risk and Mortality Rates Dropping or Stabilizing in Most Countries, 5-Year Data Shows
Prostate cancer's incidence and deadliness has declined or stabilized in much of the world in recent years, with the greatest decrease in risk evident in the U.S.,  a study reports. These findings were presented at the recent 2019 American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting, which took place in Atlanta. The research, “Global variation in prostate cancer incidence and mortality rates, 1980-2013,” was presented by MaryBeth Freeman, MPH, a senior associate scientist in surveillance research with the American Cancer Society, whose headquarters are in that cit. Still, prostate cancer remains the second most commonly diagnosed cancer worldwide, and, the study reported, was the most commonly diagnosed cancer among men in 96 countries in 2012. But the rate of diagnosis across countries is not fully known. "Previous studies have indicated significant variation in prostate cancer rates, due to factors including detection practices, availability of treatment, and genetic factors," Freeman, this study's lead author, said in a press release. "By comparing rates from different countries, we can assess differences in detection practices and improvements in treatment." The cancer society researchers set out to provide an update on patterns of prostate cancer incidence and mortality in countries on five different continents, using the most up-to-date data available through the International Agency for Research on Cancer and the
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