Men with BRCA2 Mutations Should Get Regular PSA Screening, Phase 3 Interim Data Suggest

Men with BRCA2 Mutations Should Get Regular PSA Screening, Phase 3 Interim Data Suggest
Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing — a controversial approach to detecting prostate cancer — spotted the cancer more often, at a younger age, and in more serious forms in men older than 40 who carry mutations in the BRCA2 gene than in non-carriers, interim data of a large Phase 3 study show. Based on these findings, researchers are calling for annual PSA screenings in this high-risk group to help detect early signs of prostate cancer, and potentially save lives. The study, "Interim results from the IMPACT study: evidence for PSA screening in BRCA2 mutation carriers," was recently presented at the 2019 NCRI Cancer Conference in Glasgow. It was also published in the journal European Urology. The BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are associated with an increased risk of ovarian and breast cancer. This has led to the development of preventive surgery and increased screening in women carrying BRCA mutations. While prostate tumors in men with BRCA2 mutations are very aggress
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