Lynparza Particularly Effective in Prostate Cancer Patients Carrying BRCA Mutations, Phase 2 Study Shows

Lynparza Particularly Effective in Prostate Cancer Patients Carrying BRCA Mutations, Phase 2 Study Shows
Lynparza (olaparib), a breast and ovarian cancer treatment, is also showing promising results in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) who carry mutations in DNA repair genes, particularly the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, according to data from a Phase 2 study. The study’s final data, “Olaparib in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer with DNA repair gene aberrations (TOPARP-B): a multicentre, open-label, randomised, Phase 2 trial,” was published in the journal The Lancet Oncology. Lynparza is an oral treatment developed by AstraZeneca and Merck (known as MSD outside the U.S. and Canada), which has been approved to treat advanced forms of ovarian and breast cancer. As a PARP inhibitor, Lynparza works by blocking the activity of the PARP enzyme — a DNA damage sensor — leading to the accumulation of DNA damage and ultimately the death of cancer cells. This therapy is particularly effective in cancer cells that rely on PARP to survive and grow due to defects in other DNA repair pathways — such as those with mutations in homologous recombination (HR) genes, including the BRCA genes. This association is also present in prostate cancer, according to data from the first part of the TOPARP Phase 2 clinical trial (NCT01682772) called TOPARP-A, which was designed to identify biomarkers of response to PARP inhibitors in 49 previously treated mCRPC. The study’s second part, called TOPARP-B, sought to validate this association in 98 men with mCRPC and mutations in HR genes. The men were recruited at 17 U.K. hospitals. This was the first prospective clinical trial in a genetically pre-defined patient population with mCRPC. Participants were randomly assigned to receive 300 mg or 400 mg of Lynparz
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