Cancer DNA Levels in Blood Can Predict Treatment Responses

Cancer DNA Levels in Blood Can Predict Treatment Responses
Analyses of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) — DNA from cancer cells circulating in the bloodstream — in blood samples can be used to predict which men with advanced prostate cancer are more likely to respond to treatment and who is more likely to have the disease return later on. The new, non-invasive test is less intrusive and more convenient than conventional tissue biopsies, and has the potential to replace several methods currently used to characterize and monitor prostate cancer. It also offers patients the possibility of being able to use tailored therapies and to avoid or rapidly discontinue treatment with medications that are unlikely to be beneficial. These are the findings of a new study, "Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) dynamics associate with treatment response and radiological progression-free survival (rPFS): Analyses from a randomized phase II trial in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC)." It was carried out by investigators from the Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, both in the U.K. The data recently were shared in an oral presentation at the 2020 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Virtual Scientific Program, held online. Blood samples were collected from 216 men with metastatic
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