Long-term ADT Found to Raise Risk of Cardiovascular Death

Long-term ADT Found to Raise Risk of Cardiovascular Death
Long-term exposure to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), a common treatment for prostate cancer, is associated with worse cardiorespiratory fitness and a higher risk of cardiovascular death, a new study reports. Men who received ADT therapy for more than six months were ultimately found to have a nearly four times higher risk of death than those not exposed to the therapy. The study, "Reduced Cardiorespiratory Fitness and Increased Cardiovascular Mortality After Prolonged Androgen Deprivation Therapy for Prostate Cancer," was published in JACC: CardioOncology. ADT, also called hormone therapy, works by inhibiting hormonal signals that drive prostate cancer growth. The efficacy of this cancer treatment regime has been well-established. However, some studies have reported an association between exposure to ADT and a higher risk of cardiovascular death. Other research has found no such association. Similarly, there have been conflicting reports on whether ADT impacts cardiorespiratory fitness, which is closely related to a person's risk of cardiovascular death. Now, researchers at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Dana Farber Cancer Institute, both in Boston, set out to compare cardiorespiratory fitness and cardiovascular death among prostate cancer patients who received ADT and those who did not. Data for 616 patients followed at a single center were examined; all underwent an exercise treadmill test after their prostate cancer diagnosis. The men's mean age was 69.6 years, and the treadmill test was performed a median of 4.8 years after their diagnosis. Most patients (81.8%) had high cardiovascular risk, based on the presence of at least two risk factors. These factors included high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, and obesity. A lar
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.