Cardiac Risk of Prostate Cancer Patients Should Factor in Use of Hormone Therapy, Study Says

Cardiac Risk of Prostate Cancer Patients Should Factor in Use of Hormone Therapy, Study Says
Hormone therapy is a common treatment for prostate cancer, but researchers at the Yale Cancer Center are reporting that it may do more harm than good to some patients who have previously suffered a heart attack. The study, "Assessing Potential Cardiovascular Risk Against the Benefits of Hormonal Therapy in Men With Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer," was recently presented at the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) Meeting in Boston. Prostate cancer cells rely on male sex hormones (androgens) to grow. For this reason, hormone therapy is used  to suppress the production of such hormones or their ability to bind to specific receptors, stopping the spread and growth of the tumor cells. Researchers used a decision analysis model — from a previously study that had compared quality-adjusted life expectancy (QALE) in men age 50, 60, and 70 who received radiation therapy for high-risk prostate cancer and stratified by cardiac risk — to evaluate treatment options for men with mostly intermediate-risk prostate cancer also grouped by cardiac risk. Specifically, they analyzed data from the recently published EORTC 22991 trial (NCT00021450), which included from 819 patients with intermediate-risk (74.8 percent) and high-risk  (24.8 percent) prostate cance
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