Experimental Model Finds High PSA Levels After Prostate Cancer Surgery May Not Lead To Metastasis

Experimental Model Finds High PSA Levels After Prostate Cancer Surgery May Not Lead To Metastasis
shutterstock_171525971Recent findings published in the Clinical Cancer Research journal, show that some prostate cancer patients who present elevated levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) after a radical prostatectomy (RP), may die of causes unrelated to prostate cancer long before they are diagnosed with prostate cancer metastasis. The study, titled “Overdetection of Recurrence after Radical Prostatectomy: Estimates Based on Patient and Tumor Characteristics” estimated the chance that an untreated PSA-recurrence  (PSA-R) would not progress to clinical metastasis within the patient's lifetime, leading researchers to conclude that in this population, treatment for recurrence may not be beneficial. “Previous studies have indicated that the interval from PSA recurrence to metastasis is quite long, with a median of more than eight years, even in the absence of any treatment for the recurrence,” Ruth Etzioni, PhD, full member of the Public Health Sciences Division at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington and senior author in
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