Men Who Opt to Forgo Aggressive Therapy For Prostate Cancer Not Being Monitored Appropriately

Men Who Opt to Forgo Aggressive Therapy For Prostate Cancer Not Being Monitored Appropriately
An increasing number of men with a diagnosis of low-risk prostate cancer are deciding for active surveillance -- closely monitoring their cancer – instead of opting for aggressive treatments to avoid the side effects of surgery and radiation, including erectile and urinary dysfunction. However, results from a recent study published in the journal Cancer, indicate that less than 5% of men who opt to forgo aggressive therapy are being monitored appropriately, placing them at risk of their cancer progressing or metastasizing. In the article titled “Population-based assessment of determining predictors for quality of prostate cancer surveillance,” Karim Chamie MD and colleagues from UCLA conducted a population-based study to assess the quality of active surveillance for prostate cancer, using data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare, identifying 37,687 men diagnosed with prostate cancer between 2004 and 2007 who were followed until December 31, 2009. Bivariate and multivariate regression analyses were used to quantify the use of prostate-specific antigen tests, office visits, and second prostate biopsies within 2 years of diagnosis. According to Dr. Karim Chamie, the study's first author and an assistant professor of urology at UCLA, the results revealed that of the 3,656 men diagnosed with prostate cancer who did not undergo aggressive therapy, only 166 men (4.5%), were being monitored correctly. "This is really an important finding, because before patients
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