ADT Use in Blacks with Prostate Cancer Best Reserved for Those at High Risk

ADT Use in Blacks with Prostate Cancer Best Reserved for Those at High Risk
Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) may be more risky a prostate cancer treatment approach in African-Americans than in others with this cancer, possibly because this patient population has accompanying conditions that interact poorly with ADT and shorten survival, according to a recent study. “The use of ADT in African-American men should be reserved for treating higher-risk prostate cancer, for which level-one evidence supports its use,” Dr. Anthony V. D’Amico, a professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and chief of genitourinary radiation oncology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, wrote in the study, also reported in a press release. “However, they [African-Americans] are also more likely to harbor occult high-grade/stage prostate cancer despite low-risk prostate cancer indices, and ADT use is often required to maximize survival,” D’Amico added. “Because of this dilemma, it remains unanswered whether the use of neoadjuvant ADT in favorable-risk prostate cancer to reduce prostate size and facilitate brachytherapy …  is helpful or harmful in African American men.” ADT is an anti hormone therapy used with radiation therapy to treat intermediate- or high-risk prostate cancer. Androgen hormones such as testosterone are required for prostate cancer cells to grow. Reducing the level of testosterone with drugs can
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