‘Active Surveillance’ Reinforced as Therapy Option for Low-Risk Prostate Cancer

‘Active Surveillance’ Reinforced as Therapy Option for Low-Risk Prostate Cancer
Instead of immediate radiation therapy or surgery, a significant proportion of American men with low-risk prostate cancer could choose "active surveillance" as a safe, viable option to monitor their disease. That finding comes from a recent analysis of Sweden's National Prostate Cancer Register (NPCR) showing that active surveillance has become the dominant management strategy for men with low-risk prostate cancer in Sweden, which could serve as a benchmark to compare its use around the world. The study, “Uptake of Active Surveillance for Very-Low-Risk Prostate Cancer in Sweden,” published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Oncology, compared the Swedish data to models from the United States and showed that greater use of active surveillance will increase the cost-effectiveness of prostate cancer screening. Active surveillance is a monitoring option that allows patients to screen for any signs of tumor growth before removal or therapy is considered. Active surveillance is accomplished through blood tests, physical exams and periodic biopsies of prostate tissue. The study’s authors say that the move to active surveillance also averts the risk of sexual dysfunction, as well as bowel and bladder problems that are common when choosing traditional therapies. In addition, researchers found that when faced with the options, most men already chose to monitor their prostate cancer. The study found that between 2009 and 2014 the use of active surveillance increased in men of all ages from 57% to 91% for
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *