Prolia, Osteoporosis Therapies Improve Bone Health in Prostate Cancer Patients, Review Suggests

Prolia, Osteoporosis Therapies Improve Bone Health in Prostate Cancer Patients, Review Suggests
A review of clinical trial results revealed that patients with non-metastatic prostate cancer receiving androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) can benefit from osteoporosis therapies, known as bisphosphonates, and from Prolia (denosumab), which significantly increase bone mineral density (BMD). The review, “Bone Health and Bone-Targeted Therapies for Nonmetastatic Prostate Cancer,” was published in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine. ADT is the most common therapy used in men diagnosed with prostate cancer. But the therapy “is associated with many potential adverse effects, including significant bone loss and increased risk for low trauma or fragility fractures similar to that in persons with primary osteoporosis,” researchers wrote. The new study by researchers at the University to Toronto found that non-metastatic prostate cancer patients starting or continuing ADT had significantly less BMD loss when they were given bisphosphonates (a class of medicines that slow down or prevent bone loss) and Prolia (the only FDA-approved therapy for cancer treatment-induced bone loss), compared with those receiving a placebo, normal care, or other active treatments. “This is welcoming news as nearly half of all men with non-metastatic prostate cancer will receive ADT at some point,” David Samadi, MD, chairman of urology at New York’s Lenox Hill Hospital, said in a press release. “However, an unfortunate side effect of ADT is the potential for significant bone loss. This makes it imperative that a man would need to be aware of this as even a minor injury can make them susceptible to a fracture, similar to what you would see in someone with osteoporosis.” The review set out to evaluate the effectiveness of drug, supplement, and lifestyle
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