Prostate Cancer Often Deadly for Urban American Indians and Alaskan Natives, Study Shows

Prostate Cancer Often Deadly for Urban American Indians and Alaskan Natives, Study Shows
The mortality toll of prostate and breast cancer is significantly higher in urban American Indian and Alaskan native populations compared to non-Hispanic whites, a retrospective study shows. The study, “Disparities in Prostate, Lung, Breast, and Colorectal Cancer Survival and Comorbidity Status among Urban American Indians and Alaskan Natives,” appeared in the journal Cancer Research. "It's been reported that the AIAN [American Indians and Alaskan Natives] community has a higher cancer burden than other racial/ethnic groups," Marc A. Emerson, MPH, who was a fellow in the Intramural Research Training Program in the Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences at the National Cancer Institute while conducting this work, said in a press release. However, the availability of data regarding cancer incidence and mortality in these two groups is still considerably limited, particularly among members who live in urban areas, said Emerson, who is now a PhD candidate at the Department of Epidemiology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Researchers conducted a retrospective analysis to assess all-cause and cancer-specific mortality — focusing on prostate but also breast, lung, and colorectal cancer. The study included 582 American Indians and Alaskan natives, and 82,696 Caucasian patients enrolled in the
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