Long-term Use of Cholesterol-lowering Medications May Benefit Some Prostate Cancer Patients, Trial Shows

Long-term Use of Cholesterol-lowering Medications May Benefit Some Prostate Cancer Patients, Trial Shows
Long-term treatment with atorvastatin, a cholesterol-lowering medicine, may reduce the proliferation of prostate cancer cells in some patients, a randomized trial suggests. Results from the trial were published in the study, “Atorvastatin Versus Placebo for Prostate Cancer Before Radical Prostatectomy—A Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Clinical Trial,” in the journal European Urology. Atorvastin is a type of statin, which is a medication that lowers cholesterol. The use of statins is associated with improved prostate cancer-specific survival, and laboratory studies have shown that statins exert numerous anticancer effects. However, they have never been tested in prostate cancer patients in a randomized clinical trial. To address this, researchers recruited 160 men with prostate cancer scheduled to undergo a prostatectomy at Tampere University Hospital in Finland to determine whether treatment with atorvastatin has any beneficial effects on prostate cancer, compared with a placebo. Patients were randomized to receive either 80 mg of atorvastatin or a placebo from the day they were enrolled in the trial until they had surgery. Participants received the treatment for a median of 27 days, with 96% compliance. Researchers evaluated a number of different parameters, including effect on tumor growth and levels of serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) — a biomarker associated with prostate cance
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