Radioactive Compound Shows Promise as Therapy for Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer Patients

Radioactive Compound Shows Promise as Therapy for Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer Patients
Treatment with the radioactive molecule lutetium-177-PSMA-617 (LuPSMA), which binds to the prostate-specific membrane antigen, is a potential therapeutic strategy for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), results from a pilot study suggest. The findings were shared in the poster, “Results of a 50 patient single-centre phase II prospective trial of Lutetium-177 PSMA-617 theranostics in metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer,” presented at the 2019 Genitourinary Cancers Symposium, Feb. 14–16 in San Francisco. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is found at high levels in prostate cancers, particularly in patients with castration-resistant disease — a form of cancer that no longer responds to hormone therapy and continues to progress. More research is assessing the potential of using agents that target this protein to deliver radioactive compounds directly into cancer cells. The LuPSMA molecule is composed of an anti-PSMA antibody bound to the radioactive compound Lutetium-177. Its safety and efficacy is being assessed in a pilot Phase 1/2 study by researchers at the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Australia. The trial (ACTRN12615000912583) enrolled 50 metastatic CRPC patients whose tumors were positive for the PSMA factor. Their cancer had progressed after standard treatments, including hormone therapy and chemotherapy, and they were offered four doses of LuPSMA, each given six weeks apart. Participants had rapidly progressing disease, taking 2.6 mon
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