Guidelines for Radiation Therapy with COVID-19 Urge Less Treatment

Guidelines for Radiation Therapy with COVID-19 Urge Less Treatment
New guidelines for radiation oncologists suggest that, during the COVID-19 pandemic, interactions with healthcare professionals should be done remotely where possible, and treatments should be avoided or delayed to minimize strains on the system and risks to the patient. The guidelines, "Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy Recommendations in Response to COVID-19," were published in the journal Advances in Radiation Oncology. Radiation therapy is a common part of prostate cancer treatment. However, it requires repeat visits to a hospital, which could cause undue risks under the ongoing COVID-19 outbreak. Routine hospital trips raise the risk of exposure to the virus, and people with cancer may be more likely to have serious complications if infected. Undergoing radiation therapy during the pandemic also puts demands on hospital resources, both equipment and personnel, already dealing with an unexpected influx of  with COVID-19 needing care. "The decision to delay life-saving cancer treatment in a time of a resource-intensive pandemic represents a clinical conundrum without modern precedent," the prostate cancer experts in the U.S. and U
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