UK Support Program Helps Ease Psychological Stress in Prostate Cancer Survivors

UK Support Program Helps Ease Psychological Stress in Prostate Cancer Survivors
A new web-based support program could help reduce the psychological stress that affects prostate cancer survivors, a recent study concluded. The program was created by researchers and clinicians at the U.K.'s University of Surrey and National Health Service (NHS). The web-based tool offers prostate cancer survivors online cognitive behavioral therapy sessions and both filmed and interactive peer support. The study, “A Web-Based Intervention to Reduce Distress After Prostate Cancer Treatment: Development and Feasibility of the Getting Down to Coping Program in Two Different Clinical Settings,” was published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research Cancer. In the U.K., over 47,000 men are diagnosed with prostate cancer every year, about 129 new diagnoses every day. The side effects of prostate cancer treatment, which include urinary, sexual, or bowel complications, can negatively affect psychological health. Recent studies have shown that 65 percent of men with the disease say they have unmet psychological needs, and up to a third experience anxiety or depression. Additionally, prostate cancer patients have a greater risk of suicide, suggesting that the U.K.’s healthcare system is failing to provide sufficient psychological care to this patient group. Researchers found that this new system helped men cope with their disease and the side effects of treatment. Study participants reported feeling empowered by the program, signaling a change of attitude in how t
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